When bands become their own tribute bands

My favorite metal band, Queensrÿche, now exists as two bands.  Meet-QUEENSRYCHE-Both-of-Them

 

It’s a mess.  Despite a rather large anti-Tate/Pro-Wilson bias, this article here does a decent job of detailing the twists and turns of the band’s craziness.  What I find most interesting about the split (other than how much the whole thing resembles a divorce – and considering one of the band members married and then quickly divorced Geoff Tate’s daughter, that couldn’t have helped band dynamics) were the competing visions.  In essence (and despite the fact both versions of the band are releasing new albums), Geoff Tate wanted to keep recording and playing new music, and the rest of the band rather explicitly stated they preferred to play songs from the first five albums (their most popular ones, and their most “metal” ones).  In essence, the debate was over progressing musically or else becoming your own cover/tribute band.

It seems like that step is inevitable.  It seems very few artists have the longevity to keep releasing new music that sells well their entire careers.  Most bands, at some point, start playing their own oldies (even if they may throw in a new tune here or there – I saw America in concert once, and in the two hour concert, they played a total of two songs that were “new-ish” and the rest were their oldest and greatest hits).

I have no real insight on this topic.  I just found it somewhat interesting.  It’ll be interesting to see which version of the band actually prevails in court over the legal right to the name.

Remastered to be crap

For Christmas, my wife got the remastered edition of the original Battlestar Galactica score (we’re talking 1970s, Stu Phillips – with a bonus disco version of the theme song!)
It should have been great.  I already have it on CD, but that CD sounds like someone stuck a microphone next to the speakers on a LP player and put that on the CD, so I had high hopes for a remastered version.  It was crap.  Yes, it’s cleaner, crisper – and completely lacking in the bottom end.

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Your Caprica Update

Caprice went there last night.  Last’s night episode actually tied into the BSG series finale in a huge way.  I don’t know if this is/was the plan all along, or it’s a last ditch attempt to create some buzz, but there’s a definite and specific connection made far beyond “this is the origins of the Cylons.”

More below the fold

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10 Brief Notes on Caprica

1.  You really should be watching this.

2.  The nature of the show is such that each episode is not as self-contained as episodes of BSG.  I will do a more comprehensive post when the mid-season break hits in mid-March.

3.  This week episode was quite cyberpunky.  Until now, it had mostly been family drama, with no action.  But Admiral Adama has an all powerful Neo-esque sister avatar walking around Caprican cyberspace, kicking trash and taking names.  Makes for an interesting tonal shift in the episodes, but it works.

4.  The Adamas are “Tauron” which apparently means Jewish-Italian-Arab-Greek-Hispanic.

5.  The actor playing Daniel Greystone has gotten a lot better since the pilot.

6. No wonder the Cylons wanted to destroy humans.  The Zoe avatar inside the first Cylon was forced to watch her parents have sex.  And she was ordered to rip her own arm off.  The Zoe avatar is also quite selfish and too willing to manipulate the best friend of the real Zoe.

7.  The Soldiers of the one practice bi-sexual group marriage.  Interesting.

8.  Ron Moore wants to include more gay characters in his shows.  That is fine.  Now, if he could just stop making them of a certain type.  So far, we have: Cylon Saboteurs and mentally insane Admirals (see BSG: Razor), mutineers (Gaeta), cold-blooded Mafia-esque hitmen (here in Caprica, one of the Adama clan), and cold-blooded fanatical terrorists (Soldiers of the One in Caprica).

9  Either way, this is a lot better than expected.  Nothing as good as the first two seasons of BSG, but loads better than the last two seasons.

10.  So go watch the frakking show.

A Brief Book Review: The Battlestar Galactica Trilogy.

Actually, this isn’t a true “trilogy.” It’s more like “Omnibus edition of the only three licensed books that were ever released.”

I needed a BSG fix, and someone got me this for my birthday, so I read through it. Interesting, but hardly essential. The three books in this omnibus edition are:
* The Cylons’ Secret, by Craig Shaw Gardner
* Sagittarius Is Bleeding, by Peter David
* Unity, by Steven Harper

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A note on last night’s episode of Caprica.

Last night was the first episode past the pilot movie, and I have to say they are taking it in some interesting ways I wouldn’t have anticipate.
However, I won’t be reviewing new episodes each week (at least for now). This show is tonally very different than BSG – and not much happens arc-wise each episode, as this show is much more character driven. It could easily turn into a soap opera (it’s kinda sorta already halfway there), and the acting is mixed. However, I was fascinated anyway.

I recommend y’all watch the series. Last night’s episode was good enough that it gets my tenative recommendation. We’ll see if it lasts.

Caprica premieres tonight.

I reviewed the “uncut” DVD of the premier here.

For those who haven’t seen the DVD and will watch it tonight (or delayed on some DVR), here’s a place to discuss it.  Here’s the conclusion of what I concluded in that older review:

Overall, I enjoyed the movie – enough so that I look forward to the series.  There are a few discrepancies – for a series set almost 60 years before BSG, some of the technology seems more advanced than what BSG had access to, and some of it seems to have hardly changed at all.

The character dramas are compelling, though.  This is a very different series than the BSG that just ended.  It’s Dallas and the Sopranos set in space, as I said above.

The only sour spot is that Ron Moore (once again, as in the New Caprica storyline) seems to justify suicide bombing as a legitimate means of social protest.  However, as this is only the pilot, it’s hard to see where he is going with this underground monotheistic cult, so I will give him the benefit of the doubt and hope that as the series progresses this will be addressed.

A highly recommended view, though it’s not for kids.  I’m sure the edited for TV version will be more family friendly, though.